Wednesday, September 21, 2011

619 Western Building Documentary in Progress

Two independent filmmakers are documenting the 619 Western building, to be able to preserve its legacy and share its story for generations to come.

To check out the project and perhaps contribute please visit: http://www.indiegogo.com/619

OACA Seeks Proposals for Artist Space Program

The Seattle Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs is seeking proposals from individuals, groups or organizations to launch a pilot program in Pioneer Square and the Chinatown-International District to provide relocation and placement services for artists seeking affordable studio or live/work space.

The Artist Space Assistance Pilot Program (ASAPP) is designed to keep artists in Pioneer Square – a historic cultural district and home to the First Thursday Art Walk – and the surrounding area.

“This pilot program grew out of business and community concerns related to the loss of artist studio space in the neighborhood due to the Oct. 1 closure of the 619 Western Building,” said Vincent Kitch, director of the Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs. “619 was home to more than 100 artist studios and has been an important cultural presence in Pioneer Square for more than three decades. The dilemma of the Western Building reinforces the importance of this work, which could provide a cultural space model for other neighborhoods in the future.”

The selected consultant will determine artists’ need for space, identify and publicize arts space opportunities in Pioneer Square and the Chinatown-International District and provide relocation and placement services for artists. The pilot program will run from October through December 2011 and may extend longer.

The deadline for submitting a proposal is 5 p.m., Friday, Sept. 30. Proposal budgets should not exceed $10,000. The RFP is available online at www.seattle.gov/arts.

The Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs promotes the value of arts and culture in communities throughout Seattle. The 16-member Seattle Arts Commission, citizen volunteers appointed by the mayor and City Council, supports the city agency.

Tuesday, September 6, 2011

Funding Available for Seattle Neighborhood & Community Arts Events

Festivals and events color the character of Seattle’s neighborhoods. Community groups presenting a neighborhood arts or cultural event in 2012 can apply for funding through the Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs’ Neighborhood & Community Arts program.

The funding program helps Seattle’s neighborhood art councils and community-based groups produce annual festivals and events that enhance the visibility of neighborhoods, promote cultural participation, celebrate diversity and build community through arts and culture.
Neighborhood arts councils and community-based groups may seek support for a recurring festival or event that has been in existence for at least one year, has a significant arts and cultural component, is open to the public and takes place in Seattle. Applicants are not required to have 501(c) (3) tax-exempt status.

Funded organizations each receive $1,200 to support direct project expenses, including artist fees, marketing and promotional fees, venue and equipment rentals or other production-related expenses. Funds may not be used for fundraising or organizational administrative expenses. The deadline to apply is Wednesday, Oct. 26. Link to the online application at www.seattle.gov/arts.

Pick up some pointers on putting together a successful application at an information session, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 4 at the Douglass-Truth Branch of The Seattle Public Library, 2300 East Yesler Way. RSVP to Paul Rucker at paul.rucker@seattle.gov or (206) 684-7084 by Friday, Sept. 30.
A 2010 National Endowment for the Arts study of outdoor arts festivals – Live from Your Neighborhood – underscores the value of community-based events. They are accessible. family-friendly, involve exceptional numbers of volunteers, strengthen community identity and attract diverse participants who wouldn’t necessarily cross paths otherwise.

In 2011, the funding program provided $1,200 each to 40 organizations to support annual public festivals and events, including the Wedgwood Art Festival, Moisture Festival, Bastille Day Festival and Iranian Festival.

The Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs promotes the value of arts and culture in communities throughout Seattle. The 16-member Seattle Arts Commission, citizen volunteers appointed by the mayor and City Council, supports the city agency.